The Latest

The ocean.
The sea is the one big thing I miss now that I live in London, dont get me wrong, I love living in London but I grew up around the ocean and miss being able to sail, swim, surf or just be beside the seaside.
This image was taken off Dartmouth as the sun was disappearing and we were preparing to head up the English channel for an all night sail to Southampton. Its quite a journey in a small boat and took well over 24 hours, thats 24 hours with very little to do but stay awake and enjoy the view (unless you are my brother, who spent the trip either reading Harry Potter or leaning over the side being sick).
I didnt take many photos on the trip but this one I could stare at all day, they say that every snowflake is different but the same could be said about a view of the sea. 
One day I will have a view of the sea from my house, until then I will have to make do with images like this one.
Jun 1, 2013

The ocean.

The sea is the one big thing I miss now that I live in London, dont get me wrong, I love living in London but I grew up around the ocean and miss being able to sail, swim, surf or just be beside the seaside.

This image was taken off Dartmouth as the sun was disappearing and we were preparing to head up the English channel for an all night sail to Southampton. Its quite a journey in a small boat and took well over 24 hours, thats 24 hours with very little to do but stay awake and enjoy the view (unless you are my brother, who spent the trip either reading Harry Potter or leaning over the side being sick).

I didnt take many photos on the trip but this one I could stare at all day, they say that every snowflake is different but the same could be said about a view of the sea. 

One day I will have a view of the sea from my house, until then I will have to make do with images like this one.

Tim Andrews ‘Over the Hill’
I first met Tim at a Miniclick event in Brighton, I was sat next to him and kept looking over trying to work out where I knew his face from. It was only when a photo of him, by Kristina Salgvik, was projected on the wall that it clicked.
Over the last 5 years Tim has been seeking out photographers of all abilities to photograph him, recording his life since being diagnosed with Parkinsons. I was fascinated by the role reversal of a subject creating the project and immediately started thinking of how I would photograph Tim. Thankfully he was interested in my work and ideas so we began to plan.
As one of the organisers of the Photo-Forum talks I was keen to get Tim to London to speak about the project and worked my shoot around the event. Planning the talk forced me to look closely at many of the images already created of Tim, I definitely felt under pressure from all the images and the reputations of photographers who have been involved. I wanted to do the project justice and to deliver a portrait that was my take on things. Putting that pressure aside I approached the shoot with two aims, to push myself to shoot in a different way and to have the image represent Tim and his life.
The light in the shots represents rain on a window, giving a layer of separation between viewer and subject, a physical barrier mirroring an emotional one. The shoot was slow, warm and quiet, giving Tim time to relax, reflect and drift in much the same way you do when watching rain lash against a window from the safety and comfort of a warm home.
It is truly an honour to be part of the project, to discover how other photographers have approached it and to hear Tim’s perspective on working with such a wide range of my peers. 
Tim’s blog along with more images from the project (over 200 photographers have taken part) can be found here
Mar 5, 2013
Tim Andrews ‘Over the Hill’

I first met Tim at a Miniclick event in Brighton, I was sat next to him and kept looking over trying to work out where I knew his face from. It was only when a photo of him, by Kristina Salgvik, was projected on the wall that it clicked.

Over the last 5 years Tim has been seeking out photographers of all abilities to photograph him, recording his life since being diagnosed with Parkinsons. I was fascinated by the role reversal of a subject creating the project and immediately started thinking of how I would photograph Tim. Thankfully he was interested in my work and ideas so we began to plan.

As one of the organisers of the Photo-Forum talks I was keen to get Tim to London to speak about the project and worked my shoot around the event. Planning the talk forced me to look closely at many of the images already created of Tim, I definitely felt under pressure from all the images and the reputations of photographers who have been involved. I wanted to do the project justice and to deliver a portrait that was my take on things. Putting that pressure aside I approached the shoot with two aims, to push myself to shoot in a different way and to have the image represent Tim and his life.

The light in the shots represents rain on a window, giving a layer of separation between viewer and subject, a physical barrier mirroring an emotional one. The shoot was slow, warm and quiet, giving Tim time to relax, reflect and drift in much the same way you do when watching rain lash against a window from the safety and comfort of a warm home.

It is truly an honour to be part of the project, to discover how other photographers have approached it and to hear Tim’s perspective on working with such a wide range of my peers. 

Tim’s blog along with more images from the project (over 200 photographers have taken part) can be found here

Jan 15, 2013

Interview with Hunger magazine

Below is a transcript of my interview with Hunger magazine. The interview was undertaken live on Twitter, a novel and apt way to discuss my latest project ‘follow me’ www.travishodges.co.uk/followme

It was a strange experience to be interviewed this way, lots of tweets going back and forth and it was lovely to get some of the subjects from the project chipping in along the way.

The Hunger is a biannual magazine from photographer and publisher, Rankin.

We are now chatting live with photographer Travis Hodges, see his Twitter project Follow Me - Tweet us any questions.



 Where did the idea for your Twitter project ‘Follow Me’ come from?


 When I joined Twitter I promised myself that it would not turn into a faceless social media account.
 I wanted to make something creative of the process and actually meet some of the people I was following.

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 Something to relieve the guilt of virtual life! Who was your favourite to photograph and why?


 Yes, attempting to bring the online world into the offline one. As for my favorite… hard question.
 The shot of  was fun, big thanks to  for spending the am with her arm in a popcorn box!
  was great to work with, the shot got lots of attention, including selection for the exhibition.

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 It’s a real insight into how Twitter connects people. What was the most interesting thing you discovered from the project?


 Its those connections we make that interest me, Twitter has helped make it 6 degrees of separation rather than 7.
 With every portrait I take I learn something, from the subject or about myself, that is what I love about photography.
 Oh, and I discovered some amazing places like the wave lab at UCL where I photographed 

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 Did you learn anything new about yourself this time?


 I learned more about my process and working with subjects.

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  Why do you think people need social media to update people on what they are thinking and doing?

  Personally, I work in a home office so can easily get cut off from the world. Twitter is like having workmates.
  But at least you can unfollow the office bore! :)

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 What is the best thing and the worst thing about Twitter?


 best thing, its always there. worst thing, its always there. You have to be disciplined about switching off.

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 Tweeters are becoming celebrities in their own right, with a small level of infamy. Is that healthy?


 Its great that the public can chose who their celebrities are. places like Twitter make it more democratic.
 You have to follow people you want to listen to or what is the point. Any thoughts ?


I like to follow people I can interact with. I’ve made lots of friends with people I met on Twitter.  


  Twitter helps like minded people connect.

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 Does everyone want to be famous or important in a way?


 Fame is bestowed by others but I think we all strive to be important in our field.

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How will people be connecting in 10 years time?


 Just read Philip K Dick, George Orwell or Ray Bradbury, their fiction on is becoming reality. reducing language etc.
 I created my own Orwellian portmanteau for the project, each image is accompanied by a ‘Twintro’
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 As a photographer interested in social media, what do you think of Instagram?


 I am yet to try instagram, but never say never!

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  How do you think twitter helps with networking and getting work/getting people who matter to see your work?


  Its got to be part of the mix, you cant rely on one route. But it does help show people who you are.

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 If a Tweet falls in the forest and there’s no one there to hear it, does it make a sound?


 Twitter is one big forest! something like 250mil Tweets a day. Some must go unread but that is part of the beauty of it.
Spirits shelf
Jan 9, 2013

Spirits shelf

Green carpet
Jan 4, 2013

Green carpet

Feathers
Nov 26, 2012

Feathers

Horizons
Nov 23, 2012

Horizons

Rainy day
Nov 16, 2012

Rainy day

Nov 8, 2012
Euston, London
Nov 7, 2012

Euston, London